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Stand with Pride: The Working People Weekly List

Fri, 15 Jun 2018 19:00:33 +0000

Stand with Pride: The Working People Weekly List

Stand With Pride
AFL-CIO

Every week, we bring you a roundup of the top news and commentary about issues and events important to working families. Here’s this week’s Working People Weekly List.

Pride Month Profiles: Miriam Frank: "Throughout Pride Month, the AFL-CIO will be taking a look at some of the pioneers whose work sits at the intersection of the labor movement and the movement for LGBTQ equality. Our next profile is Miriam Frank."

Vote to Pay LGBT Servers a Secure, Living Wage: "The Washington, D.C., restaurant scene has reached soaring heights over the past few years. That prosperity—and the dining experiences we’ve grown accustomed to—has been built by working people putting in exhausting hours on the restaurant floor and behind the bar."

Pride Month Profiles: Tom Barbera: "Throughout Pride Month, the AFL-CIO will be taking a look at some of the pioneers whose work sits at the intersection of the labor movement and the movement for LGBTQ equality. Our first profile is Tom Barbera."

Union Veterans and Labor Volunteers Team Up with Community to Restore Interior of American Legion: "Nearly 100 union volunteers spent their Saturday painting the interior of an American Legion post. The effort, led by the Milwaukee Area Labor Council, Union Veterans Committee and the Community Service Liaison, began after legionnaire Jim Heimann noticed his home post of more than two decades was beginning to look a little dingy. Heimann is a Vietnam veteran who describes the Legion as a 'place to be with other veterans who have gone through what you’ve gone through.' Union veterans couldn’t agree more with Heimann: A gathering place for veterans is essential to the men and women who have served our country to maintain camaraderie."

Fun Ethical Essentials for Father’s Day: "There is no instruction manual for actually becoming a parent, but we know a thing or two about the kinds of things that dads are into. With Father’s Day coming up fast, Labor 411 has a few suggestions for your Dad Essentials Kit. These items work equally well for new fathers and for the men who have had years of experience at this 'dad' thing. Best of all, the items below are all made by ethical employers who treat their workers with respect and dignity. As you assemble your ethical Dad Essentials Kit, you’ll be helping to strengthen the middle class."

Worker and Consumer Groups to Santander: You’re on Notice: "The Texas heat would not be enough to deter a powerful and broad coalition of consumer groups, unions and international representatives with the UNI Global Union from delivering a powerful message to Santander Consumer USA at its annual shareholders meeting: Listen to your workers and stop practices that lead to racial discrimination in vehicle lending. According to reports by consumer advocate organizations, dealer interest rate markups on vehicle loans have resulted in racial disparities for African American and Latino borrowers compared with similarly situated white borrowers."

ITUC Report: Democratic Space for Working People Is Shrinking: "A new report from the International Trade Union Confederation concludes that the world is seeing shrinking democratic space for working people and unchecked corporate greed on the rise. The 2018 ITUC Global Rights Index documents violations of internationally recognized collective labor rights by governments and employers."

Grand Theft Paycheck: How Big Corporations Shortchange Their Workers: "A new report, Grand Theft Paycheck: The Large Corporations Shortchanging Their Workers’ Wages, reveals that large corporations have paid out billions to resolve wage theft lawsuits brought by workers. The lawsuits show that corporations frequently force employees to work off the clock, cheat them out of legally required overtime pay and use other methods to steal wages from workers."

The Anniversary of the Equal Pay Act Reminds Us to Keep Working to Close the Gender Pay Gap: "Sunday was the 55th anniversary of the signing of the Equal Pay Act of 1963 into law. The landmark law was the first that required equal pay for equal work for women."

Kenneth Quinnell Fri, 06/15/2018 - 15:00

AFL-CIO and ETUC Support Fair Trade Practices

Fri, 15 Jun 2018 14:30:50 +0000

AFL-CIO and ETUC Support Fair Trade Practices

AFL-CIO and the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC) issued a joint statement today on trade and multilateralism:

The working people of the United States and Europe have been harmed by unfair trade practices, including China’s deliberate overproduction of steel and aluminum, intellectual property theft, forced transfer of production, and violation of basic labor rights.

The working people of the United States and Europe have supported the growth of multilateral global governance since the end of the Second World War, and have continued to support that structure even as it has been increasingly captured by the interests of global corporations and the failed ideology of neoliberalism. A global economy requires multilateral institutions; the alternative is a war of all against all. We support the reform of the multilateral system so that it is more democratic, more open and takes into consideration labor-social-environmental rights, but we oppose efforts to destroy it. The refusal of the Trump Administration to engage productively in established multilateral processes at the OECD and the G-7 in recent weeks has been detrimental to the international system and we urge the Trump Administration to change course.

We support trade that is fair and effectively enforced, in particular when it comes to protecting and enhancing key international labor rights such as freedom of association, right to organize and collective bargaining. This is the only way to ensure a level playing field for workers’ rights and avoid a race to the bottom on wages and working conditions. So far, our respective governments and the European Commission have paid too much attention to international trade liberalization, while neglecting the consequences on workers’ rights and their conditions. This neglect now threatens the underlying legitimacy of the international system and must be addressed.

When states or firms break trade rules or exploit loopholes, working people are the first to be harmed, and we expect our elected governments to stand up for us. When unfair trade practices go unaddressed, working people suffer further harm. That is why we have long advocated for swift and concrete global actions to address harmful, state-driven trade-distorting practices. To avoid a spiraling trade crisis, a comprehensive multilateral approach must be developed so no country has to go it alone.

We believe that trade enforcement is most effective when our governments cooperate to achieve shared goals. The priority should be to work together to thoughtfully and effectively address trade practices, including those by China, that for too long have allowed global companies to profit at our expense instead of with us. A rules-based trading system requires that rules be enforced. We are united in support for a concerted approach to China’s trade-distorting practices and in our opposition to a trade war. We believe the failure on the part of multilateral institutions such as the World Trade Organization (WTO) to effectively address China's trade-distorting practices is a threat to the multilateral system itself and must be addressed.         

Global shared prosperity, sustainable development, inclusive growth, and respect for international labor rights require comprehensive trade reform and multilateral action. We urge all of our governments and the European Commission to work together, not at cross-purposes, to achieve these goals.

Kenneth Quinnell Fri, 06/15/2018 - 10:30

Pride Month Profiles: Miriam Frank

Fri, 15 Jun 2018 14:14:30 +0000

Pride Month Profiles: Miriam Frank

Miriam Frank
NYU Bookstore

Throughout Pride Month, the AFL-CIO will be taking a look at some of the pioneers whose work sits at the intersection of the labor movement and the movement for LGBTQ equality. Our next profile is Miriam Frank.

Miriam Frank began her career as a professor in Detroit who launched women's studies at the community college level in the 1970s. She worked with the National Endowment for the Humanities to bring discussions and cultural events to union halls and community centers. She moved to New York to teach at New York University in the 1980s. 

In 1995, she began work on Out in the Union: A Labor History of Queer America (2014), in which she collected oral histories from LGBTQ union activists, many of whom spoke to her at great risk to their personal safety and professional life. A decade later, the work was published and the voices of the activists she captured gave human shape to the intersection between the rights of working people and the rights of the LGBTQ community.

In 2015, she was interviewed by Katherine Turk. Frank spoke about the need for her research:

The field of LGBTQ history includes many studies of queer working-class communities but very few investigations of the actual work lives of queer working-class people in those communities. Traditional labor history considers the everyday lives of working-class people at their jobs in terms of unionization, job mobility, and racial, ethnic and gender segmentation in the workforce. Queer workers and queer issues have not been a topic.

She spoke of the relevance of those workers' words today:

The U.S. labor movement has a great history of strong political coalitions that have pressed for reform on economic and social problems. I wanted readers to consider how LGBTQ trade unionists developed alliances to apply their organizations’ principles and resources to queer union members’ economic status, basic civil rights, and workplace cultures. The successful LGBTQ coalitions that first emerged in the 1970s continue today, influencing collective bargaining priorities, community organizing, regional politics, and trade union ethics.

She described where the movements for labor and LGBTQ rights first started to collaborate:

But as gay liberation entered the political mainstream during the mid-1970s the strategy shifted from radical confrontation to a lesbian/gay civil rights agenda. Two issues emerged, both of them popular and possibly winnable: legal sanctions to halt sexual orientation discrimination and legalization of domestic partnerships. Anti-discrimination policies were included in unions’ constitutions in the early 1970s and the first collective bargaining agreement to protect domestic partners was ratified in 1982. Lesbian and gay advocates in the labor movement based their claims on union principles as old as the labor movement itself—an injury to one is the concern of all. 

She explained how being LGBTQ union members were able to overcome the prejudice against them in unions:

From my interviews I have consistently found evidence of LGBTQ union members supporting one another in organizational decisions and working out their differences in frank dialogue. At best that openness flows from the union hall to the workplace and back again. LGBTQ union members who have come out have usually found fair-minded allies among straight and cisgendered co-workers: on the job and in their organizations

Often what sealed that respect was the willingness of LGBTQ activists to join in the projects of their unions. Everyday tasks, focused planning, and casual conversations gave people paths for productive collaboration. Queer people were seen less as outsiders and more as compatible volunteers; the energies of new activists lightened everyone’s loads.

Kenneth Quinnell Fri, 06/15/2018 - 10:14

Union Veterans & Labor Volunteers Team Up With Community to Restore Interior of American Legion

Fri, 15 Jun 2018 13:35:49 +0000

Union Veterans & Labor Volunteers Team Up With Community to Restore Interior of American Legion

American Legion painting crew
Milwaukee Area Labor Council

Nearly 100 union volunteers spent their Saturday painting the interior of an American Legion Post. The effort, led by the Milwaukee Area Labor Council, Union Veterans Committee and the Community Service Liaison, began after legionnaire Jim Heimann noticed his home post of more than two decades was beginning to look a little dingy. Heimann is a Vietnam Veteran who describes the Legion as a "place to be with other veterans who have gone through what you’ve gone through." Union Veterans couldn’t agree more with Hiemann, a gathering place for veterans is essential to the men and women who have served our country to maintain camaraderie.

More than a dozen union organizations teamed up with members of the Legion, the local Veterans of Foreign Wars chapter and an area business to complete the job. "It looks fantastic, it’s like a brand new post," Heimann said after seeing the newly painted interior for the first time. "A Veterans Organization [such as the American Legion] is like a brotherhood, just as the unions are a brotherhood and help each other."

Members of the area labor council say they’re grateful for the service the men and women of the armed forces have given, and continue to give. When it comes to brotherhood there is a clear understanding that they’ll always have each other’s backs.

"Labor has a long history of supporting our veterans, this project show us that history is alive and well in the Milwaukee Labor community"  said Will Attig, executive director of the National Union Veterans Council, AFL-CIO. "Volunteer efforts similar to this can and will be replicated by our Union Veterans Committee’s nationwide. As one, we have and can continue to make a difference."

In all, more than $6,000 in labor and supplies was donated to the American Legion and the work was completed in less than four hours.

Kenneth Quinnell Fri, 06/15/2018 - 09:35

Fun Ethical Essentials for Father’s Day

Fri, 15 Jun 2018 04:25:23 +0000

Fun Ethical Essentials for Father’s Day

Union-made Father's Day
AFL-CIO

There is no instruction manual for actually becoming a parent, but we know a thing or two about the kinds of things that dads are into. With Father’s Day coming up fast, Labor 411 has a few suggestions for your Dad Essentials Kit. These items work equally well for new fathers and for the men who have had years of experience at this “dad” thing. Best of all, the items below are all made by ethical employers who treat their workers with respect and dignity. As you assemble your ethical Dad Essentials Kit, you’ll be helping to strengthen the middle class.

Clothes for Dad 

  • All American Clothing
  • Belleville Boots
  • Brooks Brothers
  • Ethix Merch
  • Stacy Adams
  • Thorogood Boots

Gear for Dad

  • Remington Arms
  • Standard Golf products
  • Wilson Sporting Goods

Tools for Dad

  • Black & Decker
  • Channellock
  • Craftsman
  • RIDGID

Drinks for Dad

  • Bass
  • Coors
  • Jim Beam
  • Wild Turkey

And hundreds more. Check out our listings at Labor 411.

Kenneth Quinnell Fri, 06/15/2018 - 00:25

Worker and Consumer Groups to Santander: You’re On Notice

Thu, 14 Jun 2018 17:25:36 +0000

Worker and Consumer Groups to Santander: You’re On Notice

Santander Action
AFL-CIO

The Texas heat would not be enough to deter a powerful and broad coalition of consumer groups, unions and international representatives with the UNI Global Finance Union from delivering a powerful message to Santander Consumer USA at their annual shareholders meeting: Listen to your workers and stop practices that lead to racial discrimination in vehicle lending. According to reports by consumer advocate organizations, dealer interest rate markups on vehicle loans have resulted in racial disparities for African American and Latino borrowers compared to similarly situated white borrowers.

Jerry Robinson, a Committee for Better Banks member and retiree, described his experience at Santander: "Our job was to get people who were already upside down on their loans back in their cars by making them pay more fees." In describing his experience in another department, he told the CEO that he "saw how auto dealer inflated the costs of loans. I saw first-hand how customers paid for products that they did not know were optional. Sometimes our customers were sold GAP insurance that they did not know they could decline. Practices like these added costs to their loans and made their monthly payments too high."

Leaders of unions in the finance sector from Norway, Spain, Brazil, and the global union federation, joined members of the Committee for Better Banks, CWA, the AFL-CIO and local community organizations in Dallas to participate in the shareholder meeting and directly bring this message to the company’s CEO and board of directors.

Joining the workers in sending this message was a powerful coalition of consumer and advocacy groups from across the country who shared concerns over the company’s lending practices and the risk of racial discrimination in auto lending. The letter included support from the NAACP, Americans for Financial Reform, the National Association of Consumer Advocates, Consumer Action, the Center for Responsible Lending and many other groups with long-standing records of standing with consumers and against racial disparities. The letter complemented a shareholder proposal that the AFL-CIO introduced that asked the company to prepare a report on the risk of racial discrimination in vehicle lending.

Pål Adrian Hellman, president of FINANSFORBUNDET (the national finance workers’ union of Norway), told the CEO and board of directors that he knew first-hand that "workers in Dallas and Fort Worth on several occasions have tried to meet management and discuss their collective concerns."

Outside of the shareholder meeting, workers and community leaders rallied in support of the participants of the shareholder meeting, and stood with workers as they continue their effort to build a voice and organization at Santander that can make a difference on these issues. Peggy Spencer, a Santander employee, said: "We have so many calls coming in today; we can’t get up from our desks. We don’t have time to drink water or go to the bathroom. I really need more time to help customers when I’m on the job. In 2016, I decided to join the Committee for Better Banks. I joined because want to help make Santander Consumer a better place to work."

Spencer and the Committee for Better Banks will continue to do all they can to build that voice, and hope that allies from across the region, country and world will continue to stand with them as they fight to make improvements at the company.

Kenneth Quinnell Thu, 06/14/2018 - 13:25

ITUC Report: Democratic Space for Working People Is Shrinking

Wed, 13 Jun 2018 19:08:07 +0000

ITUC Report: Democratic Space for Working People Is Shrinking

A new report from the International Trade Union Confederation concludes that the world is seeing shrinking democratic space for working people and unchecked corporate greed on the rise. The 2018 ITUC Global Rights Index documents violations of internationally recognized collective labor rights by governments and employers.

Here are some of the key findings from this year's report:

  • 54 countries deny or constrain freedom of speech, up from 50 last year.
  • More than 80% of countries have violated the right to collective bargaining.
  • The 10 worst countries for working people are: Algeria, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Colombia, Egypt, Guatemala, Kazakhstan, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia and Turkey. 
  • In 65 countries, workers were exposed to physical violence, death threats and intimidation, up from 59 last year.
  • Trade unionists were murdered in nine countries.
  • 59 countries arbitrarily arrested and detained workers, up from 44 last year.
  • The right to strike has been violated by 87% of countries.
  • 65% of countries do not allow workers to exercise the right to establish or join a trade union, up from 60% last year.
  • Again this year, the United States remains in the "systematic violations of rights" category.

Read the full report to learn more.

Kenneth Quinnell Wed, 06/13/2018 - 15:08

Vote to Pay LGBT Servers a Secure, Living Wage

Wed, 13 Jun 2018 18:17:42 +0000

Vote to Pay LGBT Servers a Secure, Living Wage

The Washington, D.C., restaurant scene has reached soaring heights over the past few years. That prosperity—and the dining experiences we’ve grown accustomed to—has been built by working people putting in exhausting hours on the restaurant floor and behind the bar.

Working people deserve to receive a fair share of the wealth they help create. And they certainly deserve economic security while lifting up a booming industry.

Instead, servers and bartenders are being paid a $3.33 hourly wage, relying on customers’ unpredictable tips to make their living.

That leaves employees wildly vulnerable to harassment, discrimination and painfully low wages. Queer workers—especially women and people of color—are predictably at greater risk than most.

From blatant bigotry toward queer servers to increasingly common fits over any public utterance of Spanish to rampant sexual harassment, employees have been left at the mercy of less-than-stellar patrons.

Currently, when a worker’s tips don’t add up to minimum wage, the employer is obligated to make up for the rest. But that puts the onus on the most vulnerable workers to speak up and ask their managers to pay them their due. Through lax enforcement and coercive management tactics, that often doesn’t happen—leaving working people to survive off less than minimum wage in a crushingly expensive city.

The industry has been quick to obscure the economic reality their workers are facing. In his recent piece opposing Initiative 77, Mark Lee claimed that “tipped employees earn incomes well above minimum wage, typically totaling $25, $35 or more an hour.”

That simply isn’t true. According to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, tipped restaurant workers in the district earn approximately $11.81 per hour. There’s no reason these workers should be left behind. It’s time for them to earn a guaranteed $15 wage—just like their counterparts in every other industry—while continuing to collect tips.

It’s a commonsense notion. The National Restaurant Association’s own internal polling found that 7 in 10 Americans support a higher minimum wage. What’s more, they’re willing to pay more for their meals to make it happen.

But the broken status quo has some deep-pocketed allies. Restaurant and bar owners have rushed to funnel money—and press their employees—into a wrong-headed campaign against the best interests of D.C.’s LGBT community.

We have a chance to break through those efforts. This Pride Month, we can make sure the voices of queer workers are heard loud and clear at the ballot box.

Jerame Davis is executive director of Pride At Work. This post originally appeared in the Washington Blade.

Kenneth Quinnell Wed, 06/13/2018 - 14:17

Pride Month Profiles: Tom Barbera

Wed, 13 Jun 2018 16:27:57 +0000

Pride Month Profiles: Tom Barbera

Tom Barbera
Pride at Work

Throughout Pride Month, the AFL-CIO will be taking a look at some of the pioneers whose work sits at the intersection of the labor movement and the movement for LGBTQ equality. Our first profile is Tom Barbera.

Tom Barbera was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey, but moved to Boston and grew to become a legend in the movements for LGBTQ rights and working people, both in his adopted hometown, and in the larger world around him.

Colleague and friend Harneen Chernow wrote about Barbera at the time of his passing:

I first met Tom in the early years of the Gay and Lesbian Labor Activists Network (GALLAN), an organization of Boston area gay and lesbian union members that came together in the late 80s to bridge the two movements – bringing the fight for class and economic justice to gay and lesbian activism and the fight for gay rights to the labor movement. It is easy to forget what life was like for gay adults in the late 80s and early 90s as many folks were closeted at work, in their unions and to their families. But not Tom. He was as out as one could be, demanding not just acceptance but a full and fabulous welcome wherever he went.

GALLAN is an important organization in the history of the LGBTQ civil rights movement, started to promote and secure workplace and other rights for the LGBTQ community. Barbera was an early and important activist for the group and he not only pursued justice and equality in GALLAN, he was active in his SEIU local and the Democratic Party. All while doing his day job serving people with developmental disabilities at the Walter E. Fernald State School.

Later, Barbera helped organize one of the first LGBTQ receptions at the AFL-CIO headquarters in Washington, D.C., in 1992. He was an active participant in the conference that led to the founding of Pride At Work. In Boston, he helped grow his local union's Lavender Caucus and helped create SEIU's International Lavender Caucus, eventually becoming national co-chair. He also was the first delegate from GALLAN or Pride At Work to serve on the Massachusetts AFL-CIO Executive Board.

Chernow continued:

There is no replacing Tom Barbera. As they say, he was a force.  Tom’s untiring commitment to a democratic labor movement, a progressive Democratic Party, electeds that represent the little guy and fight for workers’ rights, an LGBT community that took on economic and racial privilege, as well as his loyalty to friends and unending adoration for the many special people in his life, is impossible to put into words.

Upon his passing, SEIU President Mary Kay Henry fondly remembered Barbera:

I loved his wicked sense of humor and his insistence on what was fair and just. Tom had a strong belief in equality and the right of people to love who they love without judgment. He stuck his neck out and demanded equality for LGBTQ people long before it was accepted, or even safe, to do so. He was righteously indignant against all forms of oppression—racism, sexism, classism—and he wanted his brothers and sisters to understand and back each other. He lived as an ally.

Kenneth Quinnell Wed, 06/13/2018 - 12:27

Grand Theft Paycheck: How Big Corporations Shortchange Their Workers

Tue, 12 Jun 2018 16:22:54 +0000

Grand Theft Paycheck: How Big Corporations Shortchange Their Workers

Grand Theft Paycheck
Good Jobs First

A new report, Grand Theft Paycheck: The Large Corporations Shortchanging Their Workers’ Wages, reveals that large corporations have paid out billions to resolve wage theft lawsuits brought by workers. The lawsuits show that corporations frequently force employees to work off the clock, cheat them out of legally required overtime pay and use other methods to steal wages from workers.

"Our findings make it clear that wage theft goes far beyond sweatshops, fast-food outlets and retailers. It is built into the business model of a substantial portion of Corporate America," said Philip Mattera, the lead author of the report and director of research for Good Jobs First, which produced the report in conjunction with the Jobs With Justice Education Fund.

Here are nine things you need to know from the Grand Theft Paycheck report:

1. The top dozen companies from the report, in terms of wage theft settlement payouts, are Walmart, FedEx, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, JPMorgan Chase & Co., State Farm Insurance, AT&T, United Parcel Service, ABM Industries, Tenet Healthcare, Zurich Insurance Group and Allstate. With the exception of Tenet Healthcare, each of these companies had profits in 2017 of $3 billion or more.

2. More than 450 big companies have paid out $1 million or more in wage theft settlements.

3. Since 2000, there have been more than 1,200 successful collective actions that have been resolved for a total in penalties of more than $8.8 billion.

4. Only eight states enforced wage theft penalties and provided data for the report. Those eight states combined with the federal totals bring the number of cases to 4,220 and the cumulative penalties reaching $9.2 billion. This includes no data from the remaining states.

5. Fortune 500 and Fortune Global 500 companies account for the bulk of the penalties, with 2,167 cases and $6.8 billion in penalties. 

6. Seven individual settlements exceeded $100 million. The worst case was a $640 million omnibus settlement with Walmart, covering more than 60 different initial lawsuits.

7. The retail industry is the most frequent violator, followed by financial services, freight and logistics, business services, insurance, miscellaneous services, health care services, restaurants and food service, information technology, and food and beverage products.

8. The most penalized industries tend to be those that employ a large percentage of women, African American and Latino workers.

9. These numbers only include penalties that have been publicly disclosed. More than 125 confidential cases were found involving nearly 90 large companies, including AT&T, Home Depot, Verizon Communications Inc., Comcast, Lowe’s and Best Buy.

Read the full report.

Kenneth Quinnell Tue, 06/12/2018 - 12:22

   
  

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